The importance of condom distribution in schools to prevent the rise of teenage pregnancy

How many students were in the school, and how many condoms were distributed during the preceding year. Alternative schools provided 7. In fewer than one-third of schools, students obtained an average of less than one-half condom per student per year i.

Some studies have researched how to improve the effectiveness of these programs. During counseling, students are commonly informed that abstinence is the safest method of protection against STDs; they are also instructed about the proper methods of storing and using condoms.

Opposing Viewpoints Resource Center. It was later in the 18th century actively used to prevent unintended pregnancy as well. Some studies examined the attitudes of students and parents regarding condom availability programs. These results are consistent with many of the data seen in Table 4.

To reduce this problem, we identified the intercorrelated groups of variables and retained only those that measured the important construct most directly and reliably. Fagan talks about the effects of having a child out of wedlock at a very young age.

Nearly all of these schools provide specialized training for the staff members who conduct the counseling.

Response / Why Schools Should Make Condoms Available to Teenagers

For the past 11 years, Massachusetts has allowed high schools to distribute condoms to teens. Report of the protecting the right to innocence conference on sexuality education [homepage on the Internet]. Finally, schools with comprehensive K sex education or HIV education programs provided more condoms per student per year than those without such programs.

The club brought speakers to the school to discuss controversial issues, and it organized students to be active participants in our democratic society.

In Los Angeles, the school district kept records of the numbers of condoms sent to each school; thus, a single source provided accurate data for all schools in that district.

Classes Cancelled

Importance of sexuality education: In a year, only two couples out of who use condoms will have an unintended pregnancy. Since then, a number of school condom availability programs have received attention such as a Falmouth, Massachusetts, program involved in a State Supreme Court casebut in all instances we had already identified these programs.

Unfortunately, it is not known whether the changes in the pregnancy rate were related to chance variations, to the availability of condoms and transportation to nearby family planning clinics, or to other program components. Seven characteristics appeared highly related to the number of condoms provided per student per year Table 4.

The rates of sexual activity did not differ from each other or change throughout the study. The Power of Humanae Vitae. She was noticeably pregnant, and what struck me as more odd was that she was pushing a stroller with a young infant whose only word seemed to be "mommy," referring to the young girl.

In Los Angeles, the school district kept records of the numbers of condoms sent to each school; thus, a single source provided accurate data for all schools in that district. Notably, 18 of the 26 nonclinic programs begun between and were in Massachusetts, perhaps in response to a state department of education recommendation that all districts consider condom availability programs as part of their HIV education efforts.

In other schools or school districts, records either were not kept or were too unreliable. Discussion and Conclusions Our estimate that only 0. This highly significant increase strongly indicates that program characteristics have an important impact on the number of condoms distributed.

There has been much debate on this topic and one website, http: To the extent that school districts in large cities are more likely than those in smaller towns or cities to have school condom programs, the previous study may have overestimated the number of districts with condom programs.

The two basic types of sex education in the United States are abstinence-only and comprehensive. Those that oppose condom distribution believe that schools are promoting sexual activity among teens.

On the contrary, high schools are not promoting sexual activity. They are encouraging abstinence and providing protection for students who are already sexually active. And sexual responsibility today often means using a condom as a form of birth control and to prevent pregnancy and the spread of sexually transmitted diseases like AIDS.

Condom Availability Programs in U.S. Schools

Sex education teachers, guidance counselors, and trained peer educators should be available for counseling and to distribute condoms. Numerous national health organizations have adopted policies in support of school condom availability as a component of comprehensive sexuality education.

Condom Availability Programs Are Successful. A comparison of public high schools in New York City and Chicago found positive effects of condom availability programs.

Numerous national health organizations have adopted policies in support of school condom availability as a component of comprehensive sexuality education. Condom Availability Programs Are Successful. A comparison of public high schools in New York City and Chicago found positive effects of condom availability programs.

Jul 19,  · The Distribution of Condoms in Public High Schools July 19, at pm chlscott 16 comments Thesis: If public schools implement the distribution of condoms. it would promote safe sex, teach responsibility, and help to lower teen pregnancy; therefore, condoms should be distributed in public high schools.

This issue of condoms in schools is a growing concern because of increasing rates of sexual behavior, earlier onset of sexual activity, teenage pregnancy, and the spreading of STDs and HIV.

The Carnegie Council on Adolescent Development reported 17% of girls and 29% of boys engaging in sexual intercourse by age 16 (Singer ).

The importance of condom distribution in schools to prevent the rise of teenage pregnancy
Rated 3/5 based on 62 review
The Distribution of Condoms in Public High Schools | Summer Transitional Program - English